Texas child support

Child Visitation Cannot Be Denied To Texas Fathers Because Child Support Is Unpaid

TEXAS Family Code 154.011: SUPPORT NOT CONDITIONED ON POSSESSION OR ACCESS.

A COURT MAY NOT RENDER AN ORDER THAT CONDITIONS THE PAYMENT OF CHILD SUPPORT ON WHETHER A MANAGING CONSERVATOR ALLOWS A POSSESSORY CONSERVATOR TO HAVE POSSESSION OF OR ACCESS TO A CHILD.

Added by Acts 1995, 74th Leg., Ch. 751, Sec. 40, eff.  Sept. 1, 1995.

A Custodial Parent cannot refuse or cut back on visitation of a non-custodial parent just because child support has not been paid. Many custodial parents use denial of visitation as an effective way of getting child support paid.  Such conduct is against the law and punishable by contempt.

A child has an absolute right to visitation and child support.  Absent compelling reasons, visitation with both parents is always considered in the best interest of the child. Non-payment of child support should be dealt with and enforced in a proper court.  The non-custodial parent is still very important to the child’s life and must be allowed to participate in her/his life.

Conversely, a non-custodial parent cannot stop paying child support just because a custodial parent is denying visitation.

This is very important! This is Texas law!  Unpaid Child Support and Visitation with a child are two separate and distinct duties indigent of one another.  The non-custodial parent cannot be denied visitation for unpaid child support.  Do not take the law into your own hands unless you are willing to suffer the consequences and possible wrath of a Judge!

DETAIL

New Texas Laws Affecting Families – In Effect Beginning Sept. 1, 2013

Texas House Bill 845: Standard Possession Order

Amends Family Code provisions relating to standard Texas court orders for possession of a child in suits affecting the parent-child relationship. The bill specifies that written notice for purposes of such possession may now be provided by e-mail or facsimile. The bill provides additional alternative beginning and ending possession times under the standard possession schedule for Mother’s Day weekend and for Thursdays and weekends during the regular school term. The bill also repeals provisions relating to a petition by a conservator for additional periods of possession of or access to a child after the conclusion of the conservator’s military deployment.

Texas House Bill 847: Spousal Maintenance

Amends the Family Code to specify that the agreement for payment of maintenance that is enforceable by contempt is an agreement for periodic payments of Texas spousal maintenance and to prohibit the enforcement by contempt of any provision of an agreed order for maintenance exceeding the amount of periodic support a court could have ordered. The bill authorizes a court to order income withholding in a proceeding in which there is a court-approved agreement for periodic payments of spousal maintenance voluntarily entered into between the parties but prohibits such an order to the extent that any provision of the order exceeds the amount of periodic support the court could have ordered or for any period of maintenance beyond the period the court could have ordered. The bill also specifies that a division of property and any contractual provisions under the terms of a court-approved agreement incident to divorce or annulment are enforceable in the same manner as a division of property provided for in a decree of divorce or annulment. The bill updates relevant enforcement provisions to reflect this inclusion.

Texas House Bill 3017: VA Disability Benefits and Net Resources

Amends Family Code provisions relating to the calculation of net resources for the purpose of determining child support liability. The bill includes U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs disability benefits, other than non-service-connected disability pension benefits, among the types of income considered resources. The bill authorizes a court, in determining whether an obligor is intentionally unemployed or underemployed, to consider evidence that the obligor is a veteran who is seeking or has been awarded either veteran disability benefits or non-service-connected disability pension benefits. The bill also updates language regarding the wage and salary presumption used in the absence of evidence of a party’s resources.

Texas House Bill 847: Enforcement of a Child Support Order by Contempt

Amends Family Code provisions relating to motions to enforce a final order in a suit affecting the parent-child relationship. The bill establishes that a court, in hearing such a motion, is not precluded from awarding court costs and reasonable attorney’s fees to the movant upon finding that the respondent is not in contempt with regard to the underlying order. The bill repeals a provision prohibiting the court from finding a respondent in contempt for failure to pay child support under certain conditions and a provision authorizing the court to award the petitioner court costs and reasonable attorney’s fees in a Texas child support enforcement hearing under certain conditions.

Texas Senate Bill 129: Venue for a Protective Order Application:

Amends the Texas Family Code to expand the venue for filing an application for a protective order against family violence to include any county in which the family violence is alleged to have occurred.

By Nacol Law Firm | UPDATE! New Texas Laws
DETAIL

Behind on Texas Child Support Payments? Possible Trouble Renewing Your Texas Drivers License!

Texas HB 1846: Suspension or denial of issuance or renewal of a license for failure to pay child support

The court or Title IV-D agency may stay an order suspending a license conditioned on the individual’s compliance with:

  1. A reasonable repayment schedule that is incorporated in the order
  2. The requirements of a reissued and delivered subpoena
  3. The requirements of any court order pertaining to the possession of or access to a child

The court or Title IV-D agency may not stay an order unless the individual makes an immediate partial payment in an amount specified by the court or Title IV-D agency. The amount specified may not be less than $200.

A licensing authority that receives the information shall refuse to accept an application for issuance of a license to the obligor or renewal of an existing license of the obligor until the authority is notified by the child support agency that the obligor has:

  1. Paid all child support arrearages
  2. Made an immediate payment of not less than $200 toward child support arrearages owed and established with the agency a satisfactory repayment schedule for the remainder or is in compliance with a court order for payment of the arrearages
  3. Been granted an exemption as part of a court supervised plan to improve the obligor’s earnings and child support payment
  4. Successfully contested the denial of issuance or renewal of license

An order suspending a license rendered before the effective date of this Act is governed by the law in effect on the date the order was rendered.

Texas HB 1846 takes effect September 1, 2013

By Nacol Law Firm | Property and Asset Division
DETAIL

Fathers Divorcing in Texas

As family relationships grow and develop, conflicts can arise. Family law provides guidelines and offers legal alternatives to remedy the issues family members often face.

At The Nacol Law Firm PC, Mark A. Nacol addresses the concerns of clients throughout Texas in a wide scope of family law matters that include:

  • Divorce
  • Modifications and post-divorce modifications
  • Child custody and child support
  • Visitation and residence restrictions
  • Interstate jurisdiction
  • Alimony and spousal support
  • Paternity and voluntary legitimating
  • Property division
  • Adoption
  • Prenuptial and marital and domestic relating agreements
  • Post-marital agreements
  • Enforcement of court orders
  • Same-sex unions or same-sex marital conflicts and dissolution options
  • Grandparent custody and visitation rights
DETAIL
Feb
16

For Richer or Poorer, Hire Expert Help to Protect Your Interests in Your Texas Divorce

For better or worse,
For richer or poorer,
Until . . . a divorce is filed.

When there are several zeros at the end of your bank balance, as in $500,000.00; $5,000,000.00 or more, the financial aspects of divorce can be high risk.

Texas divorce laws are the same regarding the division of property whether the money and assets in a marital estate are a lot or a little; however, the courts will inevitably encounter and address more complex issues regarding the property division in a divorce case with substantial financial and business assets.

Texas is a community property state. What does that mean, as a practical matter, when divorce occurs?

1. The law presumes that all property owned by either spouse is community property, meaning that both spouses own an undivided one-half interest.
2. The court cannot divest a spouse of his or her separate property in divorce.

In a very simple explanation: Texas community property is everything earned or acquired during the marriage other than inheritances or gifts. Your paycheck is community property, your rental income is community property, the cars you purchase are community property, retirement funds accumulated during marriage are community property.

At the time of the divorce, the court will make a just and right division of the community property. “Just and right” does not mean 50/50. Often the courts will split the community property equally, but many factors may affect this division including:

1. The spouses’ earning abilities and education.
2. The spouses’ actual earnings.
3. Who has care and primary custody of the children.
4. The value of separate property owned by the spouses. If the wife inherited $3,000,000.00, should the husband be awarded more of the community property?
5. Fault in the break up of the marriage, especially if a cheating spouse spent substantial assets dating or cavorting with others.
6. The debts of the spouses.
7. Tax consequences.

The bigger the marital pocketbook, the bigger the risk to assets in play.

Texas Child Support and High Asset Divorces:

The court also has discretion in setting child support when the parents are wealthy. The Texas Family Code provides guidelines and the guidelines are presumably in the best interest of the child.

The law caps the Texas child support amount guidelines to a percentage of the first $7,500.00 of the paying parent’s earnings. However, the cap is not made of steel. The law is a guideline.

The court has the discretion to order child support in excess of the guidelines based on the children’s best interest which includes an examination of the proven needs of the children. In the case of children growing up in a high-income household, do not expect the court to necessarily limit its consideration to basic food and shelter. The court may consider many factors in setting child support, including the children’s current living standards, such as private education, nannies, medical issues, emotional issues, sports and other extracurricular activities and, in the rare case, a body guard.

When setting child support within a wealthy family undergoing divorce, the court has discretion, based on the evidence, to set order child support above the presumptive amount in the guidelines. The court’s determination is subjective and is reversed by higher courts only if the trial court “abused its discretion,” a high threshold indeed.

With so much at stake, you should hire an experienced family law attorney who can present your case clearly, and persuasively.

DETAIL

Please contact father’s rights Dallas Attorney Mark Nacol, or father’s rights Dallas Attorney Julian Nacol with the Nacol Law Firm P.C., for legal insight to your rights as a father. Both attorney Mark Nacol, and attorney Julian Nacol , provide counsel in the area of family law including divorce, father’s rights, interstate jurisdiction, child support, child custody, visitation, paternity, parent alienation, modifications, property division, asset division and more. Attorney Mark A. Nacol is board certified in Civil Trial Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. Our attorneys at The Nacol Law Firm P.C. serve clients throughout Texas, including Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Grayson, Kaufman, Rockwall and Tarrant counties and the communities of Addison, Allen, Arlington, Carrollton, Dallas, Fort Worth, Frisco, Garland, Grapevine, Highland Park, McKinney, Mesquite, Plano, Prosper, Richardson, Rowlett and University Park, Murphy,Wylie, Lewisville, Flower Mound, Irving, along with surrounding DFW areas.

TOP