We Have a New Address! New Office Location in Dallas for Nacol Law Firm – Effective August 6, 2018


The Law Office of Nacol Law Firm P.C. is proud to announce that we have moved from our Richardson TX Office location to our new office at the Walnut Glenn Tower, located at Walnut Hill Lane and North Central Expressway, in Dallas, Texas.

We look forward to seeing you at our new location!

Our new location and address is:
Nacol Law Firm P.C.
8144 Walnut Hill Lane
Suite 1190
Dallas,TX 75231

Our phone number remains the same – (972) 690-3333

Visitor Parking Information at our new office location in the Walnut Glenn Tower:
Visitor parking is available on the first floor of the attached garage on the east side of our building and along Walnut Hill in front of the parking garage.

See Map below for Directions to Nacol Law Firm in Dallas TX

How Fathers Can Improve Their Chances of Getting Child Custody in Texas

Times have changed! Mothers’ having primary custody of the children is not always the accepted social presumption as in the past. Courts, legislatures and juries are becoming more aware of the vital necessity of father’s being involved in the lives of their children. Children with positive father involvement have fewer behavior problems, higher levels of sociability, and perform better in school.

Recent research suggests that father involvement is essential to a child’s social, moral, and physical growth during the adolescent period. A father’s involvement during pregnancy affects multiple areas of child development and family well- being, from prenatal care, to the likelihood that the father will provide ongoing financial and emotional support. This body of research is gaining momentum. Local and regional governmental agencies are focusing more and more on parental father involvement in the lives of children.

As a result of the continuing evolution of fathers’ rights, Courts are now recognizing a father’s ability to care for his children as an equal to that of the mother. Starting out on an equal plane, the Court may look to which parent is more stable, has a superior income, has a parenting plan in place for the child and is capable of providing proper child care and spending more quality time with the child.

As a father, how can you increase your chances of getting child custody in Texas? You must be a good father and spend time with your children by involving yourself in their daily lives. You need to be responsible and reliable to the needs of your kids. Know and participate in all aspects of their lives. This includes school activities, doctor’s appointments, extracurricular events and getting to know and bonding with their friends.

Reflect on your own personal experiences as a child growing up and think about what was really important to you and your parent’s interaction during that period.

If a father voluntarily gives up rights to his children based on prejudices of the past in the Court system, he will feed a mother’s confidence and sponsor unnecessary ongoing litigation. The number one mistake made by fathers in the court system today is a failure to take the time to learn how the system works. Failing to learn how the family law system works may doom your case. Once you have learned the ins and outs of the family law system you will need to form a viable plan, set goals and never relent in enforcing your rights as a father.

Five of the biggest mistakes men make in a legal action are: 1) failing to respond to the legal action itself; 2) obtaining incorrect legal advice (from friends and family rather than a legal expert); 3) signing a settlement agreement that is not in agreement with and later deeply regretting it; 4) failing to perform under the actual settlement agreement signed; and 5) getting frustrated and/or acquiescing to unreasonable demands and orders.

Some of the things you may want to consider as you prepare for the custody battle are as follows:

  1. Who has the financial ability to best care for the child(ren)? Be sure to have income tax verification, W-2 Forms and other financial information available.
  2. Form a parenting plan (child care, after school care, transportation, pediatrician, etc.).
  3. Who is more stable and/or can provide the best home for the child (ren)?
  4. Where has the child (ren) been attending school? Is it possible to keep the child in the same school district?
  5. Prepare a chronology of events leading up to the divorce including treatment of the child(ren), time spent with the child(ren), activities with the child(ren), the child(ren)’s schedule.
  6. Consider if a home study should be prepared regarding each home of the child.
  7. Consider whether a psychological evaluation should be done on the mother?
  8. Is drug testing necessary? (Be sure to request hair follicle drug testing.)
  9. Is there an alcohol or other addiction problem in the home?
  10. Who can provide the best moral upbringing for the children?
  11. Is there evidence such as pictures, video tapes, etc. that may help your case?
  12. Avoid unnecessary compromising photos or data on Facebook or other social networking sites.

List any other relevant issues you feel may be important to your child custody case before you meet with an attorney about your rights as a father.

Parental Alienation Syndrome: Warring Parents + Child = Combustible Family Situation

It has now been more than 20 years since child psychiatrist, Richard A. Gardner, introduced the term of Parental Alienation Syndrome (PAS).  Dr. Gardner defined PAS as a disorder that arises in divorce or child custody disputes, when one parent deliberately damages, or destroys the previously healthy and loving relationship between the child and the child’s other parent. The main manifestation is the child’s own sudden or atypical campaign of denigration against the targeted parent without any justification.

Parental Alienation Syndrome is an evil, yet common and effective device for gaining custody of a child. Through systematic alienation, the alienating parent may slowly brainwash a child against the targeted parent. The alienating parent involved in these abusive behaviors usually gains misplaced and deleterious loyalty of the child.

The main problem with PAS is that the child actually participates in the denigrating of the alienated parent.

The main areas of denigration from the child are:

  • The child supports and tries to protect the alienating parent.
  • The child express the ideas of denigration of the target parent as his/her own idea.
  • The child gives weak and absurd reasons for his/her anger towards the alienated parent.
  • The child uses situations and scenarios that he/she could not have experienced
  • The child uses foul and often atypical language and server behavior to denigrate the targeted parent.
  • The child has no guilt over his/her cruelty towards the alienated parent and expresses hate for the parent.

Children who live in alienated family situations are usually unable to form healthy relationships with either parent.

Main areas of concern for these children impacted by Parental alienation are:

  1. Aggression and conduct disorder
  2. Disregard for social norms and authority, adjustment difficulties
  3. Emotional Distress, Anxiety, Depression, and Self Hate
  4. Lack of remorse or guilt
  5. Poor reality testing and unreasonable cognitive operations
  6. Low self- esteem or inflated self-esteem, Pseudo- maturity

Children displaying some or all of these symptoms need professional and legal help.  Parental Alienation Syndrome is sometimes recognized by the courts but is very difficult to define and most cases requires bringing in County Social Services, Child Protective Services, and /or other family therapy professionals.

Your child desperately needs your help, no matter how bad the situation is. IT IS NOT THE TIME TO GIVE UP YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS! Contact an attorney and discuss your options on how to help your child and moving forward to solve this legal situation.