Fathers Rights Blogs

Out of Wedlock Children and Texas Fathers Rights

The Brookings Institute states that 41% of all births in 2012 were to unwed mothers! What are a father’s rights over his children? With dropping marriage rates and increasing non-married couples living together, the percentage of children being born out of wedlock is growing yearly. How are the fathers of these children treated? In most states, the mother of a child has 100% of the custody rights until the paternity of the father is legally established.  How does a Texas father legally establish paternity when the mother of their child refuses to allow him to sign the birth certificate and tells him that he will never have any type of communication or relationship with his child?

In today’s fast pace world there are many situations where a woman may selfishly just want a child with no strings attached, including a dad!  Welcome to the internet dating world! Many professional men are contacting us concerning an internet dating contact, a short relationship, and pregnancy. The father then is told he will not be allowed in the child’s life and if he tries, serious legal problems will be encountered or he will face serious and costly legal road blocks pursued by the mother!

Practicing attorneys in Texas who defend Interstate Jurisdiction cases help many fathers who live in other states while the mother and child reside in Texas.

What are a father’s rights in the State of Texas? Any and every right a parent may have is available to a father who seeks them.

What should a father, living out of state, with a child living in Texas, do to establish his paternity and legally enforce his father’s rights?  He should consult an attorney ASAP who can help him obtain and preserve his paternity rights with his child.  Once the judge issues a finding of paternity, the father has all the rights of any other father such as custody, decision making, conservator rights, and visitation rights.

How does the father file for paternity of the child in Texas?

  1. Paternity Registry (Family Code 160.401-2)

A man who desires to be notified of a proceeding for the adoption of or the termination of parental rights regarding a child that he may have fathered may register with the registry of paternity:

Before the birth of the child or no later than the 31st day after the date of the birth of the child

  1. Alternate means to Establish Paternity (Family Code 160.301-2 and 160.402, 160.601)

The mother of a child and a man claiming to be the biological father of the child may sign an acknowledgment of paternity with the intent to establish the man’s paternity.  An acknowledgment of the paternity must:

  • Be in a record

  • Be signed or otherwise authenticated by the mother And the Man seeking to establish paternity

  • State that the child whose paternity is being acknowledged:

         1. Does not have a presumed father or has a presumed father whose full name is stated

         2. Does not have another acknowledged or adjudicated father

  • State whether there has been genetic testing and that the acknowledging man’s claim of paternity is consistent with the results of the testing

  • State that the signatories understand that the acknowledgment is the equivalent of a judicial adjudication of the paternity of the child and that a challenge to the acknowledgment is permitted only under limited circumstances and is barred after 4 year.

A man is entitled to notice of a proceeding regardless of whether he registers with the registry of paternity if:

  • A father-child relationship between the man and the child has been established under this chapter or another law.

  • The man commences a proceeding to adjudicate his paternity before the court has terminated his parental rights.

The parentage of a child may be adjudicated in a civil proceeding by voluntary litigation.

A Father should be proactive and enforce his rights promptly to enhance his probability of fair and equal treatment that is binding under the law!

By Nacol Law Firm | Interstate Jurisdiction . Paternity
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Texas Family Law Code on Standard Possession Orders for Holiday Visitation

Now is the time to start working on your Holiday 2013 Schedule for visitation with your children during this wonderful time of year! Here is a reminder of the current Texas Family Law Code’s Standard Possession Order for the Holidays.

§ 153.314. Holiday Possession Unaffected by Distance Parents Reside Apart.
The following provisions govern possession of the child for certain specific holidays and supersede conflicting weekend or Thursday periods of possession without regard to the distance the parents reside apart. The possessory conservator and the managing conservator shall have rights of possession of the child as follows:

Texas Family Law Code’s Standard Visitation Guidelines for Christmas Break:
(1) the possessory conservator shall have possession of the child in even-numbered years beginning at 6 p.m. on the day the child is dismissed from school for the Christmas school vacation and ending at noon on December 28, and the managing conservator shall have possession for the same period in odd-numbered years;
(2) the possessory conservator shall have possession of the child in odd-numbered years beginning at noon on December 28 and ending at 6 p.m. on the day before school resumes after that vacation, and the managing conservator shall have possession for the same period in even-numbered years;

Texas Family Law Code’s Standard Visitation Guidelines for Thanksgiving:
(3) the possessory conservator shall have possession of the child in odd-numbered years, beginning at 6 p.m. on the day the child is dismissed from school before Thanksgiving and ending at 6 p.m. on the following Sunday, and the managing conservator shall have possession for the same period in even-numbered years;

Texas Family Law Code’s Standard Visitation Guidelines for Child’s Birthday:
(4) the parent not otherwise entitled under this standard order to present possession of a child on the child’s birthday shall have possession of the child beginning at 6 p.m. and ending at 8 p.m. on that day, provided that the parent picks up the child from the residence of the conservator entitled to possession and returns the child to that same place;

Texas Family Law Code’s Standard Visitation Guidelines for Father’s Day:
(5) if a conservator, the father shall have possession of the child beginning at 6 p.m. on the Friday preceding Father’s Day and ending on Father’s Day at 6 p.m., provided that, if he is not otherwise entitled under this standard order to present possession of the child, he picks up the child from the residence of the conservator entitled to possession and returns the child to that same place;

Texas Family Law Code’s Standard Visitation Guidelines for Mother’s Day:
(6) if a conservator, the mother shall have possession of the child beginning at 6 p.m. on the Friday preceding Mother’s Day and ending on Mother’s Day at 6 p.m., provided that, if she is not otherwise entitled under this standard order to present possession of the child, she picks up the child from the residence of the conservator entitled to possession and returns the child to that same place.

Texas child visitation orders may differ from the norm to accommodate family situations so you should always check your decree first! If in doubt about your holiday visitation time, contact an attorney who can help you to make sure nothing happens to affect this special season with your children. ‘Tis the Season To Be Jolly’!

By Nacol Law Firm | Possession of Children
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Shared Parenting With Texas Child Possession Orders

If only divorced parents could mutually agree on meaningful possession schedules while co-parenting their kids! But since many cannot or will not, the Texas Courts generally use a One-Size-Fits-All Standard Possession order for all children over three years of age.  The Texas Legislature over time has expanded the schedule to make access a little more flexible. Does this always squarely meet or suit the needs of a child and her/his relationship with both parents?

The Section 153.001 of the Texas Family Code is the State’s policy on possession schedules and its formation:

  1. Assure that children will have frequent and continuing contact with parents who have shown the ability to act in the best interests of their child;

  2. Provide a safe, stable, and nonviolent environment for the child;

  3. Encourage parents to share in the rights and duties of raising their child after the parents have separated or dissolved the marriage.

The Texas Family Code, section 153.002 also states that “the best interest of the child shall always be the primary consideration of the court in determining the issues of conservatorship, possession of, and access of the child”. Because of this the Texas Courts are given wide range in determining a child’s best interest in possession schedules.

What about fair and equal Parent Possession Schedules? This is easier desired than accomplished! In E. Mavis Hetherington’s book, For Better or for Worse, Three types of co-parenting relationships are identified:

  1. Conflicted: Parents have frequent conflict, communicate badly, and have difficulty disengaging emotionally from the marriage (20-25%)

  2. Parallel: Parents who emotionally disengage from each other, with little communication and who usually do not coordinate child-related issues between themselves although conflict is minimal. (Over 50%)

  3. Cooperative: Parents who work together to actively plan their children’s lives and support each other. They work toward conflict free possession schedules in a nurturing parenting situation. (25%-30%)

Despite many separation and divorce related conflicts among parents, the main beneficial recipients of shared parenting are the children. When both parents are positively engaged in the parent-child relationship, probabilities are much higher for positive adjustment, better academic achievement and positive mental development of a child.

In Johnston & Campbell’s book, Impasses of Divorce, their findings support that the majority of parents substantially reduce their pre marital conflict within 2-3 years after divorce. Regrettably, 8%-20% of parents remain in a state of chronic high conflict!

How can Parents promote or enhance shared parenting in possession schedules?

Many parents will usually find a way or the mechanism to eventually work together for the benefit of the child, no matter how contentious the divorce. Even if shared parenting is not possible, parallel co-parenting reducing conflict may be acceptable. But if the parental conflict is high, try to use and enforce a possession schedule that limits parent contact during possession exchanges of the child and accordingly reduce conflict opportunity.

Parents: Leave your conflicts at home. You are divorced!  Concentrate on what is best for your child.  You are the lifetime primary example for your child on how families communicate.  Be mature and responsible and show your child that no matter what has occurred in the past, and regardless of fault, your joint goal is an emotionally healthy child over the long haul.

 

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Social Networking’s Impact on Lawsuits: Some Do’s and Don’ts!

Every day the impact of social networking is growing and affecting the everyday American in all aspects of their lives. The Pew Research Center, http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/social-networking-sites.aspx , has just come out with a new study, in which a record 72% of online adults are social networking users! Young adults are the predominate users, but since 2009, the 65+ users have jumped from 31% to 43%!

Another new study by Pew Research, http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/social-networking-sites.aspx , finds that most internet users would rather be anonymous online, but cannot! 86% of internet users have taken steps online to remove or mask their digital footprints and 55% of internet users have tried to avoid observation by specific organizations, people and the government! Also a sustainable amount of internet users say they have experienced stolen personal information or others have been taken advantage of from their online visibility.

Some very interesting statistics from Pew Research on “Anonymity, Privacy and Security Online”:

  • 21% of internet users have had an email or social networking site efforts compromised by someone without permission.
  • 12% have been stalked or harassed online
  • 11% have had important personal information stolen, social security, credit card numbers, or bank account information.
  • 6% have been victims of online scams or lost money
  • 6% have had their reputation damaged because of online information
  • 4% have been led into physical danger from online occurrences

What about a potential lawsuit? Are you worried about how your or the opposing party’s social networking could affect the results of a case? You should be very prudent and attentive! The best advice would be to remove yourself from all social networks or take down sites temporary until the completion of the legal case! Do Not Delete! Since that is impractical in many cases here are possible suggestions to consider in your social networking when involved in litigation:

  1. Anything you do or say online could and probably will be used against you!
  2. Make sure that your lawyer knows about your social networking habits and if there are any past conversations or photos that could be used against you.
  3. Have you ever shared a computer with your soon to be ex-spouse or potential ex-partner? Make sure you check the hard drive for relevant information concerning your lawsuit or proof that spyware wasn’t installed on the computer. Also change your email address and password for privacy.
  4. What about your children and their posting on social networking site. Your children are probably a lot smarter than you on texting, emailing or posting online and make sure you check what is being said online and on their cell phones!
  5. Check for posting from co-workers, friends, relatives and enemies as to what they are saying on your site about you or your situation to the world. You may be able to pick up some good information, or learn who is a friend and who you can trust!
  6. Never discuss financial situations or problems online. Got a new car? Taking a trip? The world doesn’t need to know!
  7. Photos or Videos should be a No! No! Until after your lawsuit is over! Delete nothing to avoid penalties assessed by the court!

Think smart, be smart! Social Networking and a Lawsuit is a very combustible situation that usually turns out to your disadvantage. Just say no!

By Nacol Law Firm | Social Networking
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New Texas Law SB 555 Protective Orders For Pets or Companion Animals : Effective Sept. 1, 2013

Many victims of domestic violence often refuse to leave an unsafe environment since many times they must leave their pet behind. These victims many times leave in such a hurry that their pets are unable to join them. The perpetrator of the domestic violence will threaten or harm the pet as a means to intimidate and gain leverage over their victims.

Texas SB 555 amends Family Law Section 85.021, to authorize a court in a protective order, to take certain actions, including prohibiting a party from removing a pet, companion animal, or assistance animal from the possession of the actual or constructive care of a person named in the order.

Texas SB 555 also amends Section 25.07 (Violation of Certain Court Orders or Conditions of Bond in a Family Violence Case) of the Penal Code to expand the definition of “possession” to mean actual or constructive care of an animal. Finally, SB 555 now amends the current law relating to provisions in protective orders regarding pets and other companion animals and provides a penalty for any offense committed by a person if that person harms a pet!

By Nacol Law Firm | UPDATE! New Texas Laws
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